Welcome to SPACE, our adult continuing education program which offers interactive monthly courses for personal enrichment! Learn more here.

February 2023April 2023

March 2023 Modules

Advanced Old English: Genesis A 2 Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Wednesdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27
This is a continuation from where we left off in Genesis A 2... The long poem that scholars have named Genesis A is a retelling and adaptation of the first 22 chapters of Genesis into a Germanic heroic poem! Among the many points of interest is that this poem contains the FIRST time in intellectual history that the NARRATIVE of the Fall of the Angels is told and made a part of the Creation Story. The poem is almost as long as Beowulf, so this module began at the beginning of the poem and now we shall continue where we left off!
Precepted by Larry Swain.

Advanced Old Norse: Vǫlsunga Saga Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Thursdays at 8:00 PM Meeting March 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27.
The Advanced Old Norse reading modules return to Vǫlsunga saga (“The Saga of the Vǫlsungs), a medieval Icelandic retelling of one of the best-known legendary cycles of the pre-modern Germanic-speaking world – stories that influenced the operas of Richard Wagner, the fantasies of J. R. R. Tolkien, and many other modern creative artists. This module picks up where previous iterations of this module left the narrative. We will translate the text of the saga and discuss both its language and how its version of the legends relates to other versions known from the medieval world. Anyone with a reading knowledge of Old Norse can join this module!
Precepted by Carl Anderson.

A Journey Through The History of Middle-earth: The Lays of Beleriand Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting for four 1-hour Webinars with James Tauber/ John Garth. Meeting on the following days: Feb 27 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 6 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 13 at 10:00 Eastern; March 20 at 3:00pm Eastern
Section 1: Meeting with Tom Hillman on Thursdays at 10:00 PM (Eastern Time) on March 2, 9, 16, 23.
Christopher Tolkien’s twelve volumes on the History of Middle-earth give unparalleled insight into the development of J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium. They contain early drafts of familiar texts, different conceptualizations of well-known stories, and in some cases completely new material.

This module is part of a series of modules covering all twelve volumes of The History of Middle-earth. This particular module will provide an overview of Volume Three, The Lays of Beleriand, as well as readings from and discussion of highlights in that volume. It will include a guest appearance from Tolkien scholar John Garth.

Whether you’ve read the History of Middle-earth before or not, the hope is that these modules will make the volumes more accessible and will enhance your appreciation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. There is no requirement that you do every single module in the series as each will be largely standalone, although in later modules, references will be made to earlier volumes.
Precepted by James Tauber.

A Journey Through The History of Middle-earth: The Lays of Beleriand Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting for four 1-hour Webinars with James Tauber/ John Garth. Meeting on the following days: Feb 27 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 6 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 13 at 10:00 Eastern; March 20 at 3:00pm Eastern
Section 2: Meeting for four 1-hour discussion classes with Sara Brown on Thursdays at 11:00 AM (Eastern Time) on March 2, 9, 16, 23.
Christopher Tolkien’s twelve volumes on the History of Middle-earth give unparalleled insight into the development of J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium. They contain early drafts of familiar texts, different conceptualizations of well-known stories, and in some cases completely new material.

This module is part of a series of modules covering all twelve volumes of The History of Middle-earth. This particular module will provide an overview of Volume Three, The Lays of Beleriand, as well as readings from and discussion of highlights in that volume. It will include a guest appearance from Tolkien scholar John Garth.

Whether you’ve read the History of Middle-earth before or not, the hope is that these modules will make the volumes more accessible and will enhance your appreciation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. There is no requirement that you do every single module in the series as each will be largely standalone, although in later modules, references will be made to earlier volumes.
Precepted by James Tauber.

A Journey Through The History of Middle-earth: The Lays of Beleriand Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting for four 1-hour Webinars with James Tauber/ John Garth. Meeting on the following days: Feb 27 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 6 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 13 at 10:00 Eastern; March 20 at 3:00pm Eastern
Section 3: Meeting four 1-hour discussion classes with Tom Hillman on Thursdays at 3:00 PM (Eastern Time) on March 2, 9, 16, 23.
Christopher Tolkien’s twelve volumes on the History of Middle-earth give unparalleled insight into the development of J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium. They contain early drafts of familiar texts, different conceptualizations of well-known stories, and in some cases completely new material.

This module is part of a series of modules covering all twelve volumes of The History of Middle-earth. This particular module will provide an overview of Volume Three, The Lays of Beleriand, as well as readings from and discussion of highlights in that volume. It will include a guest appearance from Tolkien scholar John Garth.

Whether you’ve read the History of Middle-earth before or not, the hope is that these modules will make the volumes more accessible and will enhance your appreciation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. There is no requirement that you do every single module in the series as each will be largely standalone, although in later modules, references will be made to earlier volumes.
Precepted by James Tauber.

A Journey Through The History of Middle-earth: The Lays of Beleriand Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting for four 1-hour Webinars with James Tauber/ John Garth. Meeting on the following days: Feb 27 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 6 at 10:00pm Eastern; March 13 at 10:00 Eastern; March 20 at 3:00pm Eastern
Section 4: Meeting for four 1-hour discussion classes with Tom Hillman on Thursdays at 8:00 PM (Eastern Time) on March 2, 9, 16, 23.
Christopher Tolkien’s twelve volumes on the History of Middle-earth give unparalleled insight into the development of J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendarium. They contain early drafts of familiar texts, different conceptualizations of well-known stories, and in some cases completely new material.

This module is part of a series of modules covering all twelve volumes of The History of Middle-earth. This particular module will provide an overview of Volume Three, The Lays of Beleriand, as well as readings from and discussion of highlights in that volume. It will include a guest appearance from Tolkien scholar John Garth.

Whether you’ve read the History of Middle-earth before or not, the hope is that these modules will make the volumes more accessible and will enhance your appreciation of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. There is no requirement that you do every single module in the series as each will be largely standalone, although in later modules, references will be made to earlier volumes.
Precepted by James Tauber.

A Sociolinguistic Examination of Four Spring Holidays Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
In this module, we will discuss the origins and outworkings of four major holiday which occur this coming spring: Purim (March 6-7), Nawroz (March 21), Easter (April 9), and Eid al-Fitr (April 21). First, we will discuss the assigned literature and what we know about the culture in which the holiday first originated. Then, we will discuss how the holiday is currently celebrated in various areas of the world and in particular traditions. As we identify what people groups observe the holiday we will consider the anthropological specifications of those people groups in order to imagine in what ways the given holiday might form or reflect the cultural characteristics of that people group.
Precepted by Eve Droma.

Beginning Greek 6 Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting at 9:00 PM for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes scheduled for March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
Want to read the NT in the original Greek? The Greek translation of the Old Testament? This module’s for you! We continue our study introducing learners to the basics of ancient Greek: the alphabet, introduction to the verb system (tenses and moods) and the noun system (the very helpful article, first and second declension). Over several modules, the students will learn the foundations of the language and then students will be able to read texts.
Precepted by Larry Swain.

Creative Writing: Workshop Candidate

Mondays and Thursdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for either 1-hour sessions on March 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27
We will meet to blend learning, discussion, and playing games with reading, appreciating, and commenting on one another’s work as it is submitted for peer review. Writers are encouraged—but never required—to submit new pieces in any state of draftiness or readiness up to 2,000 words each week for peer reading and feedback. Our Collaborative Feedback method, developed here at Signum University, asks us comment at the author's comfort level through a structured reader (not editor) response. We gather to encourage the story that the author wants to tell. Our philosophy of kindness first might just turn around your previous experience of writing groups.

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Note: A seat has been reserved in this module for a writer of traditionally marginalized identity. There is no form; simply write to [email protected] to identify yourself as someone who qualifies for and wishes to use this space in the writing group.
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Precepted by Sparrow Alden.

C.S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Candidate

Meeting Wednesdays and Fridays at 10:00 AM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Join Ms. Elise for a cozy and relaxed Book Club as we read and discuss the magic of C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.
Precepted by Elise Trudel Cedeño.

Don't Panic! Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:00 PM Eastern Time for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
Douglas Adams' Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy was first a radio production, then a novelization, then a tv series, then a movie. If this is giving you fits, don't panic, there's even more. Grab your towel, and thumb, and hitch a ride for a rediculous look at the lighter side of science fiction. Where were you when you heard those recordings for the first time? Or discovered the trilogy was 5 (or 6?) books? In this SPACE course we will cover the 12 fits of the radio drama's first series, and the first 2 books in the trilogy that it covered: Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Restaurant at the End of the Universe. There may be spoilers and digressions into the other adaptations and possible series in progress as well.
Precepted by Carrie Gross.

Exploring The Three Body Problem First in the Series Candidate

Meeting at 9:00 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays meeting March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28.
First ever Asian winner of the Hugo award for best novel, as well as winning the Chinese Yinhe (“Galaxy”) award for best novel, and nominated for the Nebula award for best novel, and serving as the source material for an upcoming Netflix series by the same name, The Three-Body Problem is an exploration of both humanistic and technological themes in the context of Chinese history and contemporary society, all set in a narrative of alien invasion. There are few novels better for beginning to explore Chinese science fiction, so please join us as we take a deep dive into this fascinating masterpiece!
Precepted by Robert Steed and Jennie Starstuff.

Introduction to Binding Books by Hand Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Wednesdays at 11:00 AM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27
Do you love the physical object of a book just as much as the information it contains? Do you smell your books when you get home from the library or the bookstore? Do you like working with your hands to make things? Then this module is for you!

This class is an introduction to the materials, tools, and methods of making books by hand. Whether you're looking to make "junk journals" on a tight budget or want to rebind your favorite tome in leather, you'll find the information you need in this module!

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Course Outline:

• Class 1: Brief History of Book Binding and Tools Overview
• Class 2: Materials and Terms - The Anatomy of a Book
• Class 3: Text Block Assembly 1 - Glued Binding Options - Perfect Binding and Double Fan Binding
• Class 4: Text Block Assembly 2 - Sewn Binding Options - Kettle Stitch, Coptic Binding, and Japanese Stab Binding
• Class 5: Cover Assembly 1 - How To Make a Softcover - Paperback and Wrap Covers
• Class 6: Cover Assembly 2 - How To Make a Hardback - Classic/English Binding and Hollow Back Case Binding
• Class 7: Cover Decoration and Finishing - Traditional and Modern Methods
• Class 8: Overflow, Resources for Further Research, and Final Q & A
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Precepted by Praise Moyer.

Introduction to Linguistics Candidate

Meeting Wednesdays and Fridays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24.
This course is a basic introduction to the scientific study of the mechanics of language, with a bit of an extra focus on considerations relevant to studying literature.
Precepted by Aidan Aannestad.

Japanese for Beginners 3 Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays @5:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
In this series of modules, you will get familiarized with basic Japanese vocabulary and structures. Using a communicative approach, you’ll learn basic expressions, start to learn the hiragana script, and recognize katakana and kanji in a fun and interactive way. We will also explore Japanese culture in general. いっしょに日本語を学びましょう!
Precepted by Pilar Barrera.

Korean for Beginners 1 First in the Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Wednesdays at 5:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27.
What do Korean dramas, K-pop, webtoons, and Korean films all have in common? ... The Korean language!

This module is for those who are ready to begin their journey in Korean. In this first step, we will learn to read the Korean alphabet (Hangeul), cover basic vocabulary, and begin exploring grammar and honorifics. We will be following a textbook, but will also spend time exploring song lyrics and a webtoon. The textbook we will be following is: Yonsei Korean 1-1 published by the Yonsei Korean Institute.

Note: This course has the potential to become a series of modules for those who wish to pursue higher levels of proficiency.
Precepted by Sam Roche.

Latin in a Year 12 Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 10:00 AM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 27.
Having worked through a complete introductory Latin textbook, students taking Latin in a Year will now be able to translate many easier Latin passages with speed and accuracy, and will be able to work through more advanced texts with the aid of a good grammar book and dictionary.

In this culminating month, students will translate textbook passages specifically designed and annotated for student practice and also attempt some simplified Classical and Ecclesiastical texts that draw upon their current knowledge base. A celebration of student accomplishments, this conclusion to the Latin in a Year series will let students review recent grammar and vocabulary and sample a variety of texts that they may enjoy working through in the future.
Precepted by Faith Acker.

Latin in a Year 3 Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 6:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on February 28, March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23 (please note new day compared to Jan & Feb)
Having experienced first- and second-conjugation verbs in the previous two months, students will spend much of this month learning the forms for third- and fourth-conjugation verbs, interspersed with demonstrative and personal pronouns and some irregular adjectives. The third segment of Signum SPACE's Latin in a Year sequence, this module covers chapters 8-11 of Wheelock's Latin.
Precepted by Faith Acker.

Magic: Grimoires 1 Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
In this module we will use Owen Davie’s Grimoires: a History of Magic Books as a guide to look at a number of different texts, focusing on Late Antiquity to Early Modern books. We will discuss where the books were used, by whom, and how some were related to one another. We will also look at how the books were spread and received, as well as, when possible, some details about individual books. Because of the breadth of the subject we will not have time to delve too deeply into the texts themselves.
Precepted by Shawn Gaffney.

Malory’s Morte Darthur 3: Tristram and Isolde Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Wednesdays & Fridays at 2:00 PM for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
This frequently overlooked portion of Le Morte Arthur contains the longest and perhaps richest of the book’s stand-alone narratives. The Tale of Sir Tristram de Lyones (the fifth book in Malory’s Arthurian saga), follows Tristram from his tragic origins—his mother died in childbirth while searching for her kidnapped husband— through Tristram’s doomed love affair with the Belle Isolde, wife of his bullying and cowardly uncle, King Marc. Amidst war, sorcery, political intrigue, and rancorous family conflicts, the two lovers attempt to snatch what happiness they can before it all comes crashing down. The story also features the often-poignant and (for medieval audiences) hugely popular adventures of the Saracen knight, Sir Palomides, including his friendship and rivalry with Tristram, his unrequited love for Isolde, and his taking up of the hunt for the Questing Beast. All in all, The Tale of Sir Tristram is said to contain in microcosm all of the major themes and relationships found throughout Le Morte Darthur as a whole.

Note: Students may participate in this series in any month even if they did not take a previous class in the series.
Precepted by Liam Daley.

Meeting the Horned God of the Witches Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Fridays at 3:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28.
The Horned God, alongside being modern paganism's most popular deity, enjoys a rich heritage in speculative fiction and popular culture. In this module, we will explore his ancient (and modern) origins, his appearances in both esoteric and popular literature, and his surprising role as an environmental figure. Throughout the module, students will gain familiarity with the four core figures that make up the Horned God (Pan, Cernunnos, the Sorcerer of Trois Freres, and Herne the Hunter), and key narratives associated with him. They will also have an opportunity to ponder the complex web of influences between modern paganism and speculative fiction.

This module builds on the work of Margaret Murray and the module 'The Witch-Cult Hypothesis', but does not require prior knowledge of the material covered there.
Precepted by Anna Milon.

Middle High German 1: An Epic Introduction First in the Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Fridays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28
Middle High German (MHG) is the umbrella term for the German dialects used in the Holy Roman Empire from about 1050 to 1350. Its written form was the language of the court, and most MHG poetry embraces chivalric intellectual interests – adventure, romances, and courtly love! In our epic introduction to the language, we begin with a poem on subject matter that Old English and Old Norse students will immediately recognize: Das Nibelungenlied, the story of Siegfried (Sigurd) the dragon slayer, who we all know from the Völsunga Saga, the Poetic Edda, and (as his father Sigmund) Beowulf.

This module requires absolutely no modern German, but you may find that the course awakens that bit of “school German” you remember from high school. We will read our text – the 14th “Adventure” of The Nibelungenlied – slowly, as a small reading group. The benefit of the Nibelungenlied’s style is that enjambment is rare and each line can be treated as a single sentence.
Precepted by Isaac Schendel.

Music Theory for the Mathematically-Inclined Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Thursdays at 8pm Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27
Music is often described as mathematical but music theory is rarely taught from this perspective. This course will cover traditional basic music theory but will explore some of the underlying mathematical reasons why music works the way it does. Nothing beyond high school math is required.
Precepted by James Tauber and Sarah Monnier.

Nordic Madness: Exploring Children's Literature in Three Nordic Authors Candidate

Meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 3:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28.
In this module we will join the madness, adventure and melancholy of three famous Nordic authors: Hans Christian Andersen, Astrid Lindgren, and Tove Jansson; from the tragic unrequited love of a snowman to the crazy adventures of Pippi Longstocking and the Moomins, this module is a rollercoaster of emotions and beautiful images. You will need two books: Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren and Moominland Midwinter by Tove Jansson.
Precepted by Pilar Barrera.

Old English 3 Continuing Series Candidate

Select this class if you wish to continue in the Old English series with Dr. Swain / Dr. Schendel. Section with Dr. Swain: Meeting Tuesdays & Fridays at 7:00 PM Eastern Time for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28. Section with Dr. Schendel: Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 7:00 PM Eastern Time for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28.
Ready to begin learning Old English? This series of modules introduces students to the vocabulary and structure of the earliest recorded form of the English language. One year of modules prepares the student to read texts from over a thousand years ago! Each one-month module builds on the previous one, so students ready to learn Old English will communicate with our Director and Professor Swain to make the right placement for everyone.
Precepted by Larry Swain and Isaac Schendel.

Old Norse 3 Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 4:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27
This series of modules introduces you to the vocabulary and grammar of Old Norse, preparing you to read medieval sagas, eddic poetry, and even Viking-Age runic inscriptions. Each one-month module builds on the previous one, so students ready to learn Old Norse will communicate with our Director and Professor Anderson to choose the right placement for everyone.
Precepted by Carl Anderson.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Text, Translation, Film Candidate

Meeting Wednesdays & Fridays at 12 noon Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Can Sir Gawain keep his honor without losing his head? This short classic of Middle English chivalric romance follows Gawain on a quest testing his heroism, social etiquette, sexual virtue, and existential sense of self. This course explores: first, the extraordinary history of the single, unique manuscript which preserves this poem (as it “slept” on a library shelf for 400 years, escaped destruction by fire, and was eventually rediscovered in the 19th century); second, the translations which brought this poem to a twentieth century readership – focusing in particular on J.R.R. Tolkien’s; and finally, the 2021 film by David Lowery.
Precepted by Liam Daley.

Supernatural Shockers: "War in Heaven" by Charles Williams First in the Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
Charles Williams was a friend of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, Dorothy Sayers, and other influential writers of the early 20th century. He wrote seven startling metaphysical thrillers: bizarre, engaging, wild novels in which the supernatural invades ordinary life. In this course, we'll talk about War in Heaven, in which a saintly archdeacon, a poetic duke, and a publisher's clerk race to save the Holy Grail from the three satanists who want to use it to destroy the world.
Precepted by Sørina Higgins.

The Science of Reading: Teaching Your Kids How to Read Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00 AM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
Is your child struggling to learn how to read? Do they have trouble sounding out words, or understanding the meaning of new words? Do you struggle to explain why "one" begins with an o, and not a w? Then come learn more about the Science of Reading!

This introductory module will show you all about the Science of Reading, and why everyone should understand these fundamental linguistic principles throughout their reading journeys (not just kids!). We will discuss the history of the American Reading Wars and how they have impacted reading instruction, what happens in your brain as you learn to read, and how to use systematic, "building-block" approaches in your own home when reading with your little ones. If you're interested in the "why" and "how" of reading, then this module is for you!
Precepted by Elise Trudel Cedeño.

Tolkien and the Sea Candidate

Meeting Wednesdays and Fridays at 3:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions with classes on March 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24.
From the subcreation of Ulmo to travels from Cornwall to Avallonë, the Sea has played a special role in Tolkien’s world. This module looks at key instances of the Sea’s appearance in his writing corpus so that fellow readers can more fully appreciate the haunting beauty of water’s meaning and Tolkien’s imaginative ability. We will be reading excerpts from Tolkien’s legendarium, poetry, and creative historical works.
Precepted by Jennifer Rogers.

Tolkien's Great Tales: The Fall of Gondolin Candidate

Meeting Mondays and Thursdays at 6:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on March 2, 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27
Although they were never completed in his lifetime, JRR Tolkien wrote what he considered his three "Great Tales" of the Elder Days and intended them to be a significant part of his wider Silmarillion. These Tales are The Tale of Beren and Lúthien, The Children of Húrin, and The Fall of Gondolin. Some parts of these Tales can be found within the published version of The Silmarillion, but the more recently available individual books provide additional and extensive details for each story.

In this course, we will have a ‘read-along’ discussion of The Fall of Gondolin. Each session we will consider our close reading of a section of the story, examining Tolkien’s use of language and narrative structure, as well as exploring ideas about what each Tale tells us about Tolkien’s secondary world.

Access to a copy of The Fall of Gondolin will be necessary, and you may find having a copy of The Silmarillion very useful.
Precepted by Sara Brown.

Tools of the Song Writer Candidate

Meeting Saturdays at 11:00 AM Eastern for four 2-hour sessions with classes on March 4, 11, 18, 25
What are the songs that stick in your memory? Are they catchy earworms that have you humming their melodies all day? Are they complicated jazz numbers, where lyrics give place to musical elaboration? Are they ballads, where the story is the thing?

The answer varies from listener to listener, but the great songs of whatever sort have some things in common. We're going to look for these things together, considering the conventions of different genres, poetic styles and their interaction with musical choices, a bit of music theory (that won't hurt a bit, I promise) and arrangement.

Each class session, we will listen to and talk about two or three songs. we'll discuss the choices the song writer(s) made, and how they affect your experience as a listener. We'll also look at how a single song might be interpreted differently by different artists, because performance is an inseparable element of how a song lands.

Students need have no grounding in music theory, or be musicians. All that is required is a love of music, and the desire to learn a little about the song writer's craft, whether that's in aid of becoming a more discerning listener, or because there's a song buried in your soul that you've not yet written.
Precepted by Chris Bartlett.

Video Game Studies: The Hex Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 9:00 PM Eastern Time for eight 1-hour sessions, with classes on March 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28
Join us in a creaky old tavern, in a forgotten corner of the video game universe, to unravel a murder mystery. Daniel Mullins' The Hex experiments with video game genres to tell its story of two game developers and their creations, worlds and characters alike, vying for freedom and survival. The Hex is available on Steam (and videos of playthrough can be found for those who would rather not play the game.)
Precepted by Wesley Schantz.
If you have any questions about the SPACE program, please reach out to [email protected].