Welcome to SPACE, our adult continuing education program which offers interactive monthly courses for personal enrichment! Learn more here.

March 2024May 2024

April 2024 Modules

Advanced Old English Series: Readings in Poetry
First in the Series Confirmed

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25
Welcome to the Readings in Poetry page for the Advanced Old English Series in which students explore, in alternating months, a work of prose and then a work of poetry to introduce students to the breadth and depth of Old English texts available for study. Each month Dr. Swain surveys the group to see what they want to tackle next from month to month.
Precepted by Larry Swain

Beginning Japanese 2
Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 9:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Building on the material covered in Beginning Japanese 1, we will cover lessons three and part of four in the Genki textbook, including: introduction to and learning to use katakana; solidifying usage of hiragana; introduction to kanji (around 10-20); developing communication abilities beyond stative sentences, focusing on the introduction of non-stative verbs; new vocabulary; continuing the development of fluency in the four aspects of language mastery.
Precepted by Robert Steed

Bible as Literature: The Gospels in the Their Contexts
Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 5:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25
This module considers the gospels in their contexts; addressing their genre, the communities to whom they are addressed, their origins, early tradition and legend about how they came to be, comparisons of their literatures to other Hellenistic and Near Eastern ones, the synoptic problem, and related issues.
Precepted by Larry Swain

Book Club: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Confirmed

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 10:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25
Gulping gargoyles, let's read the next Harry Potter book!

By popular demand, here is the long-awaited Harry Potter book club! We will get together twice a week to explore the series, reading through the books at a relaxed pace. Connect with fellow readers and share your insights as we discover (or rediscover) the magic.

Over one month, we will follow twelve-year-old Harry's adventures as he uncovers the dark secrets lurking beneath Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Whispers and plots abound within the castle, as Harry must confront the evil legacy of Voldemort.

This book club is all about sharing the moments of unexpected, joyful discovery through close reading. Focusing on the text, we will share our personal readings and experiences. We will learn from our classmates in a kindness-first, supportive environment.

Together, we can tackle some big questions about the series. What was it about the Harry Potter books that resonated with so many people? To what extent is it possible or indeed desirable to separate art from artist?

Most of all, however, we will have an inclusive dialogue that embraces a multiplicity of views and enriches our experience of the text.
Precepted by Julian Barr

Book Club: J.R.R. Tolkien's The Return of the King (Part One)
Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Join Ms. Elise for a cozy, relaxed Book Club series, where participants come to our Club meetings with their own reflections and discussion questions about the text. YOU get to guide the magic! In this module, our readings will specifically focus on Book V of The Lord of the Rings. Bring a cozy blanket, a cup of tea, and enjoy!
Precepted by Elise Trudel Cedeño

Creative Writing: Start Writing Mysteries!
Spotlight  Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Fridays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 5, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26
So you think you'd like to write a mystery, but it seems overwhelming? Join us to examine the essential elements of a murder mystery: a setting, a sleuth, a murder victim, the murder method, a cast of suspects, the cast who assist the sleuth in investigating and solving the murder, as well as lists of actual clues and red herrings to plant in the story. We'll also discuss how the genre conventions affect your development of general fiction elements (e.g., plot, character, pacing). Brainstorm, refine rough ideas into workable ones, and get help starting on your story-specific research. Leave class with a semi-plan: not an outline, but a collection of notes you can use to write a complete first draft in whatever writing style you prefer.
Precepted by Carol Oliver and Will Estes

Creative Writing: Workshop (Novel in a Year)
Continuing Series Confirmed

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 9:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25
Using a kindness-first approach, we will read, appreciate, and comment on each other’s work as we deepen our understanding of writing craft. You will be encouraged to submit new works in progress at any level of development for peer reading and feedback. Our Collaborative Feedback method guides you to comment at the author's comfort level through a structured reader response. This workshop will foster a positive and encouraging environment to support our growth both as individuals and as a writing community. We gather to encourage the story that you want to tell.

Novel in a Year Note: Anyone is welcome to join our Novel in a Year modules at any time (the only exception is Tree Workshop (Novel in a Year 11) which, while open to all who have a mature writing project ready for close scrutiny, is designed specifically for students who have completed at least 4 previous modules in the Novel in a Year sequence). Each module is designed to stand alone without prerequisites. However, for the richest experience, the full twelve-month sequence of modules will carry you from blank page through to completing your novel. In a writing journal, you will track your progress and moments of unexpected, joyful discovery as you continue your novel. Whether you are looking to publish commercially or simply writing for yourself, our program is designed to nurture your individual writing journey. Our workshops place kindness first, lifting up excellence and encouraging you to tell your story in your own voice. For more information about our Collaborative Feedback model, check out our video here.
Precepted by Sparrow Alden and Will Estes

Eating Our Way Through Anime
Confirmed

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
What can a carefully arranged bento box show us about a protagonist’s emotions? How does a steaming bowl of ramen help tell a story? Anime is known for its detailed, mouthwatering portrayals of food. But what exactly makes these artistic culinary delights so special, and why do we keep coming back for more?

In this module, we will consider many aspects of food in anime and its relationship with fandom, culture, and history, and how food signals certain things about characters, settings, and relationships.

Come help us eat our way through anime!

Electronic Text Markup With XML and TEI
Confirmed

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 2:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25
This module will introduce the markup of literary and historical texts electronically. It will begin with a tour of the Extensible Markup Language (XML) and then the guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). There will plenty of hands-on activities to markup your out-of-copyright texts of choice but please note that these activities will require a computer (not just a phone or tablet).
Precepted by James Tauber

Intermediate Latin Translation: The Vulgate Hester
Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25
Designed for students who have completed an introductory Latin textbook and wish to explore real Latin texts at a gentle pace, this class will walk students through Hester from the Latin Vulgate, adapting the quantity of texts and homework to meet the needs of the enrolled students. We will parse passages and work through Hester somewhat slowly to allow ample time for grammatical review as students test different translation techniques and absorb new abbreviations, grammatical quirks, and irregular or new forms.
Precepted by Faith Acker

Introduction to Linguistics
Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
This course is a basic introduction to the scientific study of the mechanics of language, with a bit of an extra focus on considerations relevant to studying literature.
Precepted by Aidan Aannestad

Japanese for Advanced Beginners 8
Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 5:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25
The eighth in a series of modules in which we continue to explore the beauty of the Japanese language and culture. We will read tales, learn more complex structures, widen general vocabulary, and we will continue reading and writing kanji. みなさん、これからも一緒に日本語を勉強したい!楽しみにしています!
Precepted by Pilar Barrera

Japanese: From Zero - 9
Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Fridays at 9:00 AM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 5, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26
This course is for those who have an interest in Japanese culture and wish to continue our study of Japanese. We will continue using Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji, and covering grammatical structures. Through use of conversational Japanese, we will continue to explore how the language is used in anime, manga, and music.

Japanese is a language of great nuance and depth. This module will open the door to that world and build a foundation for greater insight into Japan's culture and its people.
Precepted by Sam Roche

J.R.R. Tolkien: A Life in Letters 3
(Section 2)
Continuing Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Thursdays at 9:00 PM Eastern with Patrick Lyon for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, and 25.
How do you pick up the threads of an old life? Come and take a deep dive, attempting to do just that, as we look into the life of the maker of Middle-earth! This series will go on an adventure through the life of Tolkien over three months through the lens of the newly revised and expanded Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. As the module follows the narrative presented in Tolkien's own words in his letters, the class sessions will allow for discussions of Tolkien's thoughts and problems as he raises them --- as well as the chance to read and discuss selections of his creative works along the way.

Throughout the course, we will be discussing the events of Tolkien’s life in tandem with the letters and filling out a more complete picture of the man through his work, his personal life, and his creative endeavours. Names, places, and stages of history can all too easily become abstractions on a page but, in this course, we will see the way in which Tolkien's personal environment was intimately connected to his works, and how it shaped the life of the man behind the legendarium.

You can join us for the whole series or just jump in a month at a time as we explore the newly revised and expanded Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien!
Precepted by Patrick Lyon (Section 2)

Meet The Last Man
Spotlight  Confirmed  Hybrid

Meeting on Tuesdays & Fridays at 8:00 PM Eastern for four 1-hour lectures (Tuesdays) and four 1-hour discussion groups (Fridays) on April 2, 5, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26
One of the most relevant novels you could read right now was written almost two centuries ago. Mary Shelley’s The Last Man asks what it means to be human while living in unprecedented times. This 1826 classic of apocalyptic science fiction considers the implications of a global pandemic, a rapidly changing environment, and the failures of political and social institutions. Part imaginative autobiography, part science fictional warning, and part ecocritical thought experiment, The Last Man forces us to examine our assumptions about our present and future.

In this module we will consider Mary Shelley’s novel in the context of her life, times, and intellectual history. We will also explore the afterlife of The Last Man in critical discussions of the ominously similar challenges we face in the 21st century. In the process, we will discuss the novel’s lasting meanings and contributions as pioneering work of speculative fiction.
Precepted by Amy H. Sturgis

Old English 1
First in the Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 9:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, and May 1
Ready to begin learning Old English? This series of modules introduces students to the vocabulary and structure of the earliest recorded form of the English language. One year of modules prepares the student to read texts from over a thousand years ago! Each one-month module builds on the previous one, so students ready to learn Old English will communicate with our Director and Professor Swain to make the right placement for everyone.
Precepted by Isaac Schendel

Old Norse 1
First in the Series Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Fridays at 2:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 5, 8, 12, 15, 19, 22, 26
This series of modules introduces you to the vocabulary and grammar of Old Norse, preparing you to read medieval sagas, eddic poetry, and even Viking-Age runic inscriptions. Each one-month module builds on the previous one, so students ready to learn Old Norse will communicate with our Director and Professor Anderson to choose the right placement for everyone.
Precepted by Carl Anderson

Reading John Donne’s Holy Sonnets
Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25
Renaissance clergyman John Donne was a prolific scholar and poet. His verses follow many different poetical forms and vary widely in tone from the solemn and devout to the seductive and sensual. In this module, we will study Donne’s Holy Sonnets, a sequence of poems that blend meditations on the divine with vivid but sometimes irreverent imagery. Here we will discuss selected sonnets individually and the full collection in some of the different arrangements and forms in which it was read and copied in the seventeenth century. Along the way, we will look at the connotations and complexities of words and particular lines, identify biblical and other allusions, and delight in the language of these complex and thought-provoking Renaissance sonnets.
Precepted by Faith Acker

Reading Middle English: An introduction to Middle English Language and Literature
Spotlight  Candidate

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 8:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 2, 4, 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25
This course introduces the basics of Middle English language and literature, including grammar, syntax, and pronunciation. Designed for students new to reading Middle English texts in their original form, the course focuses mainly on the English of London and the south of England in the thirteenth through fifteenth centuries—the language of Chaucer, Gower, Langland and others.

As a language-learning course as well as a literature course, the first half of each meeting will be devoted to reading Middle English aloud and answering questions about pronunciation and comprehension; the second half will focus on the reading’s content, from basics of plot and conventions of genre to the historical context of each text. Course readings include: a selection of lyric poetry, two short poems by Chaucer, the chivalric romance Sir Orfeo, the Chester play of “Noah’s Flood,” a chronicle of the reign of King Henry V, Chaucer’s “Treatise on the Astrolabe,” and selections from the Paston Letters (noble family during the Wars of the Roses).
Precepted by Liam Daley

Readings in Old English: The Battle of Maldon & Group Reading
Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, and May 1
The Battle of Maldon is the title given to a short (325 lines) alliterative poem commemorating a battle between the Anglo-Saxons and Scandinavian invaders on the english River Blackwater in 991. It describes the tragic fate of the ealdorman Byhrtnoð and his levy of Anglo-Saxon warriors after they agree to let the Vikings cross the river and fight with them on equal footing. The result is, predictably, a disaster, but the poem’s ambiguous language and positive depictions of Byhrtnoð and his retinue leave room for debate about the nature of the poem. Is it a criticism of foolhardiness and overconfidence? Is it a commemorative poem, a eulogy, or perhaps even a piece of wartime propaganda meant to rally the English to resist the Norse invaders? In this module, we will both read the poem in depth and discuss current scholarship on this poem.
Precepted by Isaac Schendel

The Women of Beowulf
Spotlight  Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Yes, there are indeed women in Beowulf. Vital and potent women in fact. From the valkyrie-esque figures to the weeping peace-weavers, a broad spectrum of women characters exists as both historical representation and imaginative mythology. Grendel's Mother is ferocious and masculine. Hildeburh laments the death of her brother and son before being carried off. Modthryth behaves like a sadistic queen. Wealhtheow is mindful of so much in her husband's hall. Freawaru seems destined for tragedy. And could the dragon be a female too? Maria Headley seems to think so. This module will explore this topic using dual-language editions of texts so we can see the original language alongside translations by J.R.R. Tolkien, Roy Liuzza, and Maria Headley.
Precepted by Chris Vaccaro

Tolkien and the Romantics: Dark Romanticism and the Gothic Literary Tradition
Candidate  Hybrid

Meeting Tuesdays & Thursdays at 1:00 PM Eastern for four 1-hour lectures on Tuesdays and four 1-hour discussion workshops on Thursdays April 2, 4, 9(pre-recorded lecture), 11, 16, 18, 23, 25
The Gothic genre has inspired many creative minds to explore the darker realms of human psychology and the wider world, sparking fear, terror, horror and repulsion in its audience. J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth is as much a ruined Gothic wasteland as it is an idyllic utopia. From Shelob's cave and the hypnotic Mirkwood to the Paths of the Dead and the Barrow-Downs, this module will examine Tolkien's use of Dark Romantic and Gothic techniques that were used by writers such as Horace Walpole, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker, and E.T.A. Hoffman to strike terror in the heart of their readers.

The module will follow an 8-lesson structure as follows:
• Lecture 1: The Funk of Forty Thousand Years: A Literary History of the Gothic
• Workshop 1: Chilly Echoes in Tolkien's Middle-earth
• Lecture 2: Bottomless Supernatural: Terror, Horror, Abject
• Workshop 2: Conjuring Creepy Creatures
• Lecture 3: The Weird, the Eerie, and the Dark Side of the Mind
• Workshop 3: Defamiliarising Middle-earth
• Lecture 4: Ruined Landscapes
• Workshop 4: What is left? Can the Gothic recover Middle-earth?

Note: The hybrid 8-lesson structure above is the new format for this module moving forward.
Precepted by Will Sherwood

Warring States Era Chinese Philosophy: Attaining Flow
Candidate

Meeting Mondays & Wednesdays at 7:00 PM Eastern for eight 1-hour sessions on April 1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24
Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, Mohism---these Chinese philosophical systems all have their foundational roots in the Warring States period of Chinese history (475–221 BCE), and as such share a set of common interests, even if their proposals for attaining those interests greatly differ. In this module we will cover the basic concerns of each of these systems, paying attention to their differences as well as their similarities, and perhaps most importantly, seeing how their proposals for the attainment of human flourishing may still have something to offer to contemporary people.
Precepted by Robert Steed
If you have any questions about the SPACE program, please reach out to [email protected].